Reclaiming the Multicultural Roots of U.S. Curriculum: Communities of Color and Official Knowledge in Education (Multicultural Education) (Multicultural Education Series) by Wayne Au

Reclaiming the Multicultural Roots of U.S. Curriculum: Communities of Color and Official Knowledge in Education (Multicultural Education) (Multicultural Education Series)

Book Title: Reclaiming the Multicultural Roots of U.S. Curriculum: Communities of Color and Official Knowledge in Education (Multicultural Education) (Multicultural Education Series)

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 0807756784

Author: Wayne Au


* You need to enable Javascript in order to proceed through the registration flow.

Wayne Au with Reclaiming the Multicultural Roots of U.S. Curriculum: Communities of Color and Official Knowledge in Education (Multicultural Education) (Multicultural Education Series)

Related Books

''In this groundbreaking book, Au, Brown, and Calderón set the record straight -- or, more properly, they excavate the record from extinction -- concerning the role of communities of color in resisting and co-opting White supremacist notions of curriculum while at the same time creating life-giving curricular options for their people. Fascinating, innovative, and rigorously researched, Reclaiming the Multicultural Roots of U.S. Curriculum will change how we think of the field of curriculum.''
--Sonia Nieto,
University of Massachusetts

''This is such a timely and necessary volume. Discourses around 'multicultural education' often fail to engage the long and significant curriculum history and hard fought efforts that made the feel viable, necessary, and intellectually powerful. This book should be on the shelf of every curriculum scholar.''
--Gloria Ladson-Billings,
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Within curriculum studies, a ''master narrative'' has developed into a canon that is predominantly White, male, and associated with institutions of higher education. This canon has systematically neglected communities of color, all of which were engaged in their own critical conversations about the type of education that would best benefit their children. Building upon earlier work that reviewed curriculum texts, this book serves as a much-needed correction to the glaring gaps in U.S. curriculum history. Chapters focus on the curriculum discourses of African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos during what has been construed as the ''founding'' period of curriculum studies, reclaiming their historical legacy and recovering the multicultural history of educational foundations in the United States.

Book Features:
* Challenges the historical foundations of curriculum studies in the United States during the turn of and early decades of the 20th century.
* Illuminates the curriculum conversations, struggles, and contentions of communities of color.
* Highlights curriculum historically as a site at the intersection of colonization, White supremacy, and Americanization in the United States.
* Brings marginalized voices from the community into the conversation of curriculum, typically dominated by university voices.